47 Days: Changing Habits, Creating New Ones, and Social Connections

There’s a movie called ‘47 Days’ coming out. It is a movie scheduled to come out in 2020 about the 47 days it takes to get a correct diagnosis for a woman who has an illness.

There’s another show, that was a television series, called ’24’.

All of the events of the series occurred, in real time, in 24 hours. Some episodes showed what was happening in one person’s perspective, and would swap back and forth to others, but the idea was the same.

This social isolation, and change to our habits as we know them, have been ongoing now since Mid-March. In fact, when I first wrote about it, I made several comments about March Madness (The NCAA Basketball Tournament), which was scheduled to happen the very next weekend.

In the last few days, as I continue to connect with some friends and family throughout this time, I have noticed that people have started mentioning where we are at in the timeline of our changes to our daily patterns and routines.

A friend of mine, with multiple children age 12 and under, texted me back this week when I asked her a couple of questions.

She responded that for ’47 days’, they have been in their house, with both parents attempting to work productively, care for their 3 children, and cook, clean, and all other tasks. She answered my question, and was able to provide me the help that I was looking for.

Today, I read on social media a post from my relative about how things have been going for her since this Social Isolation began. She discussed that she hasn’t been able to see her new grandchild except for once, is missing her family and other grandchildren, and several other facts specific to her as well as some things that are universal to all of us.

This time where we work to not spread our germs to each other, so that we can survive and not overwhelm our hospitals so that we may continue to live healthily, wreaks havoc on our Social Connections.

Social connections are the connections we have in our lives which help us get through times of stress, times without stress, and times where we want to enjoy ourselves.

They are the connections we have to help us know we have support when we need it, to help us laugh at something that we find funny, and to get along with others. Our social connections are the people who pick up our kids from day care when we are running late, listen to our story about the guy who scolded us for our driving, and help us decide when it is time for a new haircut (or not).

The Strengthening Families Institute has identified that there are 5 Protective Factors, which help us to get along in life, and to feel better about things, and to be resilient. The five factors are: Parental Resilience, Concrete Support in Times of Need, Social Connections, Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development, and Social and Emotional Competence of Children. I am a National Trainer for them, so this way of thinking is near and dear to my heart.

So here, I want to talk about how our ‘Pause’ has affected our Social Connections.

21 days tends to establish a new habit. This means, that with this social distancing and quarrantine, that we have all had the chance to establish one new set of habits, which I’ll call ‘the temporary quarantine’ habits, and then to establish a new set of them, which I’ll call the ‘in for the long haul’ habits.

As we think about our new habits, one thing I am wondering, is how you are doing with keeping your habit of having social connections, or even establishing them, if you did not already them?

Many people are starting to think about what it will look like when our restrictions loosen and they are able to get out and about again. Eventually, I will have shorter hair, with a little bit of lighter roots, and will be getting used to my sons being out of college and into their next steps.

For others, this has been a time of extreme financial hardship. Some people have less job security, as they are in jobs that may not have the capacity to pay them while the company income stream is down. Others may have had to have completely changed the way that they do their job due to the changes in need. These changes may be welcomed and be better, or they any not be a fit for the employee and be far worse than their original role was.

All of us, whether we generally are at home and go out as we have to, or whether we run errands to get around other people and like to have our lives structured, have had to change how we get our social needs met.

For some, this time of social isolation has been one of working a ton of hours due to their work role. Carry-out delivery drivers, personal shoppers, medical professionals, and many, many others have had their lives turned upside down in the way of working their jobs differently. These changes can include working less or more hours, having fewer patients, or, for those involved with allegations of abuse, only getting more serious calls when they get them.

Some people are FaceTiming, while some others are spending many, many hours with their kids, and some are teaching others kids while they raise their own.

But for all of us, our patterns have changed and that changes how we feel on a day to day basis.

I’ve written about the effects on our lives in dealing with and avoiding this virus a couple of times. I wrote about it when it first seemed like things would change, when things really had closed, and now, 45 days in, or 48, or whatever it is today, as things begin to slowly open up.

For some, who rely on social interaction and structure, this time has been really, really isolating.

For those who love to be at home, this time has been a chance to reduce the number of interactions they have with others to a level that they are comfortable with, and a way to set boundaries about how they like to talk with friends, family members, and even which hours they like to work.

For myself, my mobility is less because I fell from a bike. I am a mover by nature, and am doing all I can to get this ankle back up and ‘running’, although running is something I hardly ever do. I am learning to navigate getting around a little differently, so that changes my patterns and everyday connections.

For now, I’d like you to think of this time of change and evolving from a few perspectives.

One is, how are you adjusting to the changes in your social connections, and how are you working to feel better than you have been during this time of change and stress?

What can you do, as you want to talk to others, or even listen to someone else breathe, or to get away from the people in your home, to get that need met?

How about those of you who really like structure and routine? When you think about how you get your own needs met, how can you do that as our routines evolve and change. A routine you may have had before the ‘Pause’, is that you woke up, got ready for your day, took the dog out, got the kids ready for school, then left for work.

You may love that routine, but then had to change it to waking up, working quietly while your kids sleep, taking the dog out when he is ready to get up, and then getting the kids up and ready to do their e-learning for school.

Any change in routine can be hard and unsettling. We use our social connections to talk about how these things can be frustrating, and to bond with those close to use about how we are working to get through times of stress.

As I finish this article, I’d like you to think about who your social connections are.

Is it your spouse? Your brother?…..Maybe a best friend from college??

If you can’t think of any, then I encourage you to start with finding a social connection.

Whoever it is, and however you are used to getting those social needs met, what can you do to make that a little better, and a little easier for you?

What changes to your routine in the last 40+ days do you like? Which ones would you like to change back, or change again?

I hope that you find something you like to look at today. I love to look at things growing, and can’t get enough of looking at a cactus I planted in early spring.

Changes: Tele-everything

It’s really interesting to see how companies are changing their norms and the way they do things to adapt to the safe-at-home model.

I am wondering which of these new norms may stay in place, and which of them will go away as our risk for the Coronavirus diminishes over time.

My guess is some things will change, and some things will remain the same. 🙂

I would hope that companies would be more open to their employees doing some work from home. Instead of going into a home visit where there may be germs, bugs, or dangerous people, maybe some companies who previously only allowed in person visits will now allow for some of the tele-health that has been going on during the last few weeks.

My guess is that the platform Zoom will continue to do well. They seem to have the market on teleconferencing, and have allowed some therapists to use their features for free (and other fields is my guess, I’m only familiar with my field).

I’m really wondering about how physical touches when people greet each other will change.

Will the handshake go away? Will we no longer hug friends we haven’t seen in a while, or hug to say goodbye?

Will we start having a 6 feet distance between each other as our social norms?

Only time will tell. I’m hoping that a lot of people are able to stay healthy, including those at risk, those who feel they can live forever, and those of us in between.

What are some things that are helping you get through these times of change and uncertainty?

Are you knitting? My grandma taught me to knit many years ago, and if this continues I may try to pick it back up again. My Aunt Rula taught me to crochet, which seemed a little easier at the time. I macrame-ed in Girl Scouts.

So many options. I’ve been face-timing my mom (and dad), which has been really nice. It is nice to see the person I’m talking with, so I’ll probably keep that up as long as my mom continues to carry her iPhone 5s 🙂

What are some habits you have picked up? What are some things you are thinking about doing, but haven’t done yet?

I’ve read a couple of articles about kids feeling that this time could be a memory that is positive. They spent time at home, which many don’t get a lot of chances to do these days. I call them ‘program’ kids, because they have every minute of their day programmed.

This is certainly a social experiment, and a time to remember how to stay safe while those in the health care field are working harder than ever.

I hope you enjoy your weekend. It’s pretty warm here in Texas. Hope you get some spring weather where you are.

Homebodies: 2020

So.

We’re spending a lot more time at home this week.

We’ll be getting to know each other a little differently, we’ll be eating at our kitchen tables, even if it is take-out, and we’ll be learning to work a little differently.

I think it will be interesting to see how this affects our social media, our social interactions, and how we get along with each other. Those keyboards that have been so powerful may just be a little bit less effective in some ways. And probably, a little more effective in others.

Health workers will be overworked. We will be taxing their resources, in terms of availability, wellness, and our levels of trust and anxiety.

Our politicians, who were already working overtime to get some votes this November, now have a different platform than they had previously.

Our elderly candidates, who were already compromised in some ways, are now even more at risk.

So let’s think of some thing we can do to enjoy this time that we will be spending differently.

What are some thing you enjoy doing?

Is it doing a puzzle? Reading a book? Drawing a picture?

FaceTiming your family that is not in your home? I read earlier this week that FaceTiming allows us to get our need for social stimulation met. We get our need for visual, auditory, and it feels more like a conversation than other forms.

What is something you have been putting off? Teaching your teen to drive, getting in those CEU’s for your license or degree, or something entirely different?

I hope you stay healthy as we all go through this together.

I hope you can take the advised precautions, and that you maintain a stream of income.

I hope, that you are able to see the light and see the positives in all of this chaos

Peace 🙂

Let’s Do This! Staying Calm Amidst the Chaos

https://thriveglobal.com/stories/panic-attacks-panic-disorder-and-anxiety/

Read an article about how panic disorder, generalized anxiety, and panic attacks as they relate to our current pandemic with the Coronavirus

Wellness

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-y7dn2-d5ebd1

A podcast about wellness, march madness and mental health

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